International Actors and Traditional Justice in Sub-Saharan Africa

This book studies the role of international actors in the areas of transitional justice and justice sector aid with respect to traditional justice and legal pluralism in sub-Saharan Africa.
Editor(s):
Eva Brems, Giselle Corradi, Martien Schotsmans
book | published | 1st edition
May 2015 | xvi + 238 pp.

Paperback
€55.25 €65.-


ISBN 9781780682877

Details

This book studies the role of international actors in the areas of transitional justice and justice sector aid with respect to traditional justice and legal pluralism in sub-Saharan Africa. Based on a number of case studies, the chapters describe the kinds of policies and interventions that are supported and financed by international actors, with special attention for the kinds of strategies that are deployed in order to address areas of tension with human rights. The volume then explores the relationship between international actors’ practices and the body of knowledge that exists in these domains, as well as in general socio legal theory. Thereby, this contribution offers empirical data drawn from examples of who is doing what in a series of case studies, identifies regional trends and links them to the existing literature by examining the extent to which the insights generated so far by scholars and practitioners is reflected in the work of international actors. Based on this, the book formulates a number of hypotheses that may explain current trends and proposes additional issues that need to be considered in future research agendas. Finally, the volume links two fields of intervention that have so far evolved in rather parallel ways and explores the commonalities and differences that can be found in the areas of transitional justice and justice sector aid.

Chapters

Table of Contens (p. 0)

Part I. GENERAL INTRODUCTION

Chapter 1. International Actors and Traditional Justice in Africa (p. 1)

Part II. INTERNATIONAL ACTORS AND TRADITIONAL JUSTICE IN TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE

Chapter 2. The Role of Tradition in Transitional Justice (p. 17)

Chapter 3. The Policy of International Actors on Traditional Justice in Transitional Justice (p. 31)

Chapter 4. Non-Official Use of Tradition: A Case Study on Sierra Leone (p. 43)

Chapter 5. Official Hybridisation of Tradition: A Case Study on Rwanda (p. 55)

Chapter 6. Official Complementarity: A Case Study on Northern Uganda (p. 71)

Chapter 7. Tradition in Transitional Justice: Between Localisation and Globalisation (p. 85)

Part III. INTERNATIONAL ACTORS AND TRADITIONAL JUSTICE IN JUSTICE SECTOR AID

Chapter 8. At the Crossroads of Theory and Practice (p. 101)

Chapter 9. Justice Sector Aid in Legally Plural Africa (p. 121)

Chapter 10. Linking Socio-Legal Theory and Justice Sector Aid (p. 143)

Chapter 11. Traditional Law through a State Lens: A Case Study on Malawi (p. 163)

Chapter 12. Polycentric Legal Landscapes: A Case Study on Mozambique (p. 173)

Chapter 13. Beyond Dichotomies: A Case Study on Sierra Leone (p. 189)

Chapter 14. Traditional Law through a State Lens: A Case Study on Zambia (p. 205)

Chapter 15. From Addressing Local Legal Orders to Embracing Legal Pluralism (p. 215)

Part IV. GENERAL CONCLUSION

Chapter 16. Embracing Legal Pluralism: General Conclusion (p. 227)

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