European Yearbook on Human Rights 2018

Both in Europe and around the world, 2017 has been another difficult year for the protection of human rights. Split into its customary four parts, the tenth volume of the European Yearbook on Human Rights brings together renowned scholars to analyse some of the most pressing and topical human rights issues being faced in Europe today.
Editor(s):
Wolfgang Benedek, Philip Czech, Lisa Heschl, Karin Lukas, Manfred Nowak
book | published | 1st edition
October 2018 | xxx + 626 pp.

Paperback

€75.-

ISBN 9781780687063


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ISBN 9781780688008

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Details

Both in Europe and around the world, 2017 has been another difficult year for the protection of human rights. Examples of the increased pressure on the European human rights system are apparent: the attack on the independence of the judiciary in Poland, which was responded to by the first time initiation of the rule of law procedure by the European Commission; the increasing human rights issues arising from European migration policy; Russia’s suspension of its financial contribution to the Council of Europe and Turkey’s lowering of its contribution; and the difficulties in appointing key human rights positions in the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe.

Split into its customary four parts and complemented by book reviews of recent publications on human rights in Europe, the tenth volume of the European Yearbook on Human Rights brings together renowned scholars to analyse some of the most pressing and topical human rights issues being faced in Europe today.

Chapters

Table of contents and preliminary pages (p. 0)

Part I. Topic of the Year

The Vanishing Consitution (p. 1)

Part II. EU

The Court of Justice of the European Union and Human Rights in 2017 (p. 45)

Understanding Resettlement Through the Prism of Human Rights (p. 75)

The Decline of Fundamental Rights in CJEU Jurisprudence after the 2015 'Refugee Crisis' (p. 103)

The EU Migration Crisis and the Human Rights Implications of the Externalisation of Border Control (p. 135)

Does the EU Framework for Roma Integration Promote the Human Rights of Romani Persons in the Union? (p. 167)

The EU Guidelines on Freedom of Religion or Belief at their Fifth Anniversary (p. 193)

Human Rights Council in Troubled Waters (p. 211)

Part III. CoE

The Jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights in 2017 (p. 227)

A Decade of Violations of the European Convention on Human Rights (p. 267)

The Boundaries to Dialogue with the European Court of Human Rights (p. 287)

Unprincipled Disobedience to International Decisions (p. 319)

The Impact of ECtHR and CJEU Judgements on the Rights of Asylum Seekers in the European Union (p. 343)

The Human Right to Leave Any Country (p. 373)

Some Reflections on the Principle of the Best Interests of the Child in European Expulsion Case Law (p. 395)

Salafism in Europe (p. 419)

Delays in the Implementation of ECtHR Judgments (p. 445)

Part IV: OSCE

Enhanced Structure and Geographical Balance (p. 465)

The Crisis of the International Protection of Human Rights and the Geopolitical OSCE Perspective (p. 481)

How Multilateral Organisations Can Communicate Better About Human Rights (p. 495)

Rising Populism and Its Impact on Women's Rights (p. 521)

The Impact of #MeToo on Women's Rights in the OSCE Region (p. 543)

Part V: Others

The Role of the Ukrainian Parliament Commissioner for Human Rights in the Field of Equality and Non-Discrimination (p. 571)