European Yearbook on Human Rights 2019

The European Yearbook on Human Rights brings together renowned scholars, emerging voices and practitioners. Split into parts devoted to recent developments in the European Union, the Council of Europe and the OSCE as well as through reports from the field, the contributions engage with some of the most important human rights issues and developments in Europe. The Yearbook helps to better understand the rich landscape of the European regional human rights system and is intended to stimulate discussions, critical thinking and further research in this field.


Editor(s):
Philip Czech, Lisa Heschl, Karin Lukas, Manfred Nowak, Gerd Oberleitner
book | published | 1st edition
October 2019 | xxxii + 588 pp.

Paperback

€89.-

ISBN 9781780688541


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ISBN 9781780689562

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Details

2018 has been another challenging year for human rights in Europe and globally. International human rights standards, the rule of law and international human rights institutions have come under increasing pressure. The eleventh volume of the European Yearbook on Human Rights discusses the backgrounds of these developments and outlines the potential implications and possible solutions. The backsliding of democracy in Poland and Hungary, the human rights fallout from Brexit and the human rights situations in Chechnya and the Ukraine are mentioned as just a few examples. The Yearbook also includes contributions on all-time classics such as the right to freedom of expression or fair trial and tensions between security and the protection of human rights, as well as more recent developments on the rights of persons with disabilities and the rights of children to be heard in political processes.

The European Yearbook on Human Rights brings together renowned scholars, emerging voices and practitioners. Split into parts devoted to recent developments in the European Union, the Council of Europe and the OSCE as well as through reports from the field, the contributions engage with some of the most important human rights issues and developments in Europe. The Yearbook helps to better understand the rich landscape of the European regional human rights system and is intended to stimulate discussions, critical thinking and further research in this field.


Chapters

Table of Contents and preliminary mattter (p. 0)

TOPIC OF THE YEAR

The Council of Europe’s Response to Recent Democratic Backsliding (p. 3)

EU

The Strange Case of Northern Ireland’s Disappearing Rights in the EU-UK Withdrawal Negotiations (p. 35)

Can Reasonable Accommodation Safeguard the Employment of People with Disabilities? (p. 63)

Whistleblowing in Europe: A New Era of Legal Protections (p. 91)

A Critical Take on Opinion 1/15: Is the Glass Half Full or Half Empty? (p. 111)

Absolute Rightlessness Sur Place through Excessive Externalisation (p. 133)

Corporate Accountability Mechanisms in EU Member States for Human Rights Abuses n Th ird Countries (p. 157)

CoE

The Jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights in 2018 (p. 189)

Blasphemy and the European Court of Human Rights: A Small Step Forward, a Giant Leap Back (p. 221)

How Do European Courts Approach the Sensitive Topic of Same-Sex Marriage? An Analysis of the Case Law of the ECtHR and the CJEU in the ‘Catch 22’-Field of Equal Marriage Rights (p. 237)

The European Court of Human Rights and the Human Rights Model of Disability: Convergence, Fragmentation and Future Perspectives (p. 261)

The Undermining of Article 6 ECHR (p. 295)

The Right to a Nationality in Recent Case Law of the European Court of Human Rights and Council of Europe Bodies’ Work (p. 313)

OSCE

Pioneer Decision on Safety of Journalists in the Preceding Context (p. 339)

If I Could I Would? International Electoral Standards and the Recommendations of Election Observers (p. 369)

The Right to Political Participation of Persons with Disabilities (p. 383)

The Right of Children to be Heard through Peaceful Protests (p. 405)

REPORTS FROM THE FIELD

OSCE Moscow Mechanism: Situation of Human Rights in Chechnya (p. 419)

A Human Rights Approach to Deal with Economic and Corruption Issues in Ukraine (p. 439)

OTHERS

The Legal Authority and Recognition of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights: Conceptions, Developments and Practice (p. 471)

Teaching Human Rights at School: A Survey of Persisting Challenges to the Practice (p. 495)

Human Rights Implications for Vulnerable Migrants in Light of the EU and Italian Migration Policies (p. 517)

The Russian Constitutional Court as a Mediating Link between Russian and European Law? (p. 547)