European Yearbook on Human Rights 2022

The European Yearbook on Human Rights brings together renowned scholars, emerging voices and practitioners, comprising contributions which engage with some of the most important human rights issues and developments in Europe. The Yearbook helps to better understand the rich landscape of the European regional human rights system and is intended to stimulate discussions, critical thinking and further research in this field.
Editor(s):
Philip Czech, Lisa Heschl, Karin Lukas, Manfred Nowak, Gerd Oberleitner
Series:
European Yearbook on Human Rights
Volume:
book | published | 1st edition
November 2022 | xxx + 802 pp.

Paperback

€171.-

ISBN 9781839702655


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E-book

€171.-

ISBN 9781839703447

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Details

Human rights are at risk. Issues such as the climate crisis, ongoing conflicts in Europe and beyond, attacks on and the suppression of minorities, rapid technological changes, a war on information and the regression of democracy and the rule of law, just to name a few, challenge and question the effect of human rights. The European Yearbook on Human Rights 2022 aims to identify and address a variety of the most pressing human rights issues in Europe and beyond.

Renowned scholars, emerging voices and practitioners, in a careful selection of chapters, contribute to critical and important discussions related to, for example, climate change litigation, human rights and artificial intelligence and the right to open science. Thereby, the Yearbook stimulates necessary discussions, critical thinking and further research in the field and thus contributes to upholding human rights as guiding standards and principles in these tumultuous times.
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With contributions by Lorenzo Acconciamessa, Marguerite Arnoux Bellavitis, Emiliya Bratanova van Harten, Christian Breitler, Stuart Casey-Maslen, Philip Czech, Nasiya Daminova, Elif Erken, Francesca Fanucci, Helen Fenwick, Delia Ferri, Francesco Luigi Gatta, Valentina Golunova, Lisa Heschl, Elisabeth Hoffberger-Pippan, Andrea Huber, Eline Labey, Karin Lukas, Adelaide Madera, Alessandro Mantelero, Ronagh McQuigg, Rachel Murray, Zoe Nay, Harriet Ní Chinnéide, Manfred Nowak, Gerd Oberleitner, Ludovica Paseri, Livia Perschy, Paula Rhein-Fischer, Jennifer Roberts, Martina Sardo, Imke Steimann, Agnieszka Szklanna, Emre Turkut, Léa Urzel, Jasper Van Steenbergen and Margaretha Wewerinke-Singh.
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PHILIP CZECH is a senior scientist at the Austrian Institute for Human Rights, University of Salzburg and editor of the Newsletter Menschenrechte.

LISA HESCHL is a senior scientist at the European Training and Research Centre for Human Rights and Democracy, University of Graz.

KARIN LUKAS is a senior scientist and Head of Department at the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Human Rights.

MANFRED NOWAK is Secretary General of the Global Campus of Human Rights, Venice and Director of the Vienna Master of Arts in Applied Human Rights, University of Applied Arts in Vienna.

GERD OBERLEITNER is UNESCO Chair in Human Rights and Human Security and Director of the European Training and Research Centre for Human Rights and Democracy, University of Graz.


Table of Contents

Table of contents and preliminary pages (p. 0)

PART I. EUROPEAN UNION

New EU Funds, Migration and Protection of External Borders: What Place for Human Rights? (p. 3)

Refugee Integration in European Human Rights Law and EU Law: A Right to be Integrated? (p. 41)

The Employment Equality Directive and Access to Justice for Persons with Disabilities: Some Reflections in Light of Tartu Vangla and Komisia za Zashtita ot Diskriminatsia (p. 75)

Judges of Online Legality: Towards Effective User Redress in the Digital Environment (p. 105)

The CJEU Faced with ‘Presumption of Innocence’ Directive 2016/343: Reshaping the ECHR Standards? (p. 137)

The EU’s Role in Addressing Human Rights Violations in Hong Kong: Realistic Expectations or Pie in the Sky? (p. 177)

PART II. COUNCIL OF EUROPE

The Evolving Jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights on Domestic Abuse (p. 205)

The International Debate on AI Regulation and Human Rights in the Prism of the Council of Europe’s CAHAI: Great Ambitions (p. 225)

Human Rights and Social Media: The European Court of Human Rights in the Digital Era (p. 253)

The Freedom of Expression of the Judiciary as a Special Case of State Personnel: A European Human Rights Perspective (p. 283)

Exploring Narratives about ‘Cancel Culture’ in UK Educational/ Employment Settings under the ECHR (p. 309)

Consistency, Coherence and the Turn Towards Procedural Review in the European Court of Human Rights (p. 345)

The Execution of ECtHR Judgments Related to Inter-State Disputes (p. 379)

Lessons from the Inter-American Human Rights System to Further Utilise the Potential of NHRIs in the European Convention System: From Contextualisation to Inspiration? (p. 409)

The Turkish Post-Coup Emergency and European Responses: Shortcomings in the European System Revisited (p. 445)

Militant Democracy in the ECtHR Case Law on Genocide Denial Bans (p. 483)

From the Right to Science to the Right to Open Science: The European Approach to Scientific Research (p. 515)

Religious Accommodation before the European Court of Human Rights: Moving Forward a New Approach Towards Religious Minorities? (p. 543)

PART III. HUMAN RIGHTS BEYOND EUROPE

Practical Perspectives of Universal Jurisdiction in the OSCE Region: Factors to Ensure Accountability of Perpetrators for Torture (p. 591)

The Human Rights Agency of Universities: A Case Study on the Crisis in Afghanistan (p. 621)

Climate Change as a Children’s Rights Crisis: Procedural Obstacles in International Rights-Based Climate Litigation (p. 647)

Mitigating Human Rights Challenges by Fostering Urban Resilience: A Case Example of Graz, Austria (p. 677)

PART IV. JURISPRUDENCE BY THE COURTS

The Court of Justice of the European Union and Human Rights in 2021 (p. 705)

The Case Law of the ECtHR in 2021: The ECHR in International and Cross-Border Situations (p. 731)

PART V. BOOK REVIEWS

Dalia Palombo: Business and Human Rights: The Obligations of the European Home States (p. 773)

Joy Liddicoat: Human Rights and the Internet (p. 775)

Eduardo Arenas Catalán: The Human Right to Health: Solidarity in the Era of Healthcare Commercialization (p. 777)

Abdullahi Ahmed An-Naim: Decolonizing Human Rights (p. 781)

Sören Stapel: Regional Organizations and Democracy, Human Rights, and the Rule of Law: The African Union, Organization of American States, an the Diffusion of Institutions (p. 785)

Giuseppe Palmisano: Collective Complaints as a Means for Protecting Social Rights in Europe (p. 789)

Morten Kjaerum, Martha F. Davis and Amanda Lyons (eds.): COVID-19 and Human Rights (p. 793)

Jeroen Temperman: Religious Speech, Hatred and LGBT Rights – An International Human Rights Analysis (p. 795)

Ivano Alogna, Christine Bakker and Jean-Pierre Gauci (eds.): Climate Change Litigation: Global Perspectives (p. 797)

About the series:

European Yearbook on Human Rights

The European Yearbook on Human Rights Series brings together renowned scholars, emerging voices and practitioners, comprising contributions which engage with some of the most important human rights issues and developments in Europe. The Yearbook helps to better understand the rich landscape of the European regional human rights system and is intended to stimulate discussions, critical thinking and further research in this field.

More about this series