European Libraries and the Internet: Copyright and Extended Collective Licences

European Libraries and the Internet: Copyright and Extended Collective Licences examines libraries’ online use of in-copyright works from their collections and how such use is affected by copyright. In particular, the book examines whether the system of extended collective licences could facilitate online access without territorial limitations to in-copyright works in libraries, within Europe or more specifically within the European Economic Area (EEA).
Author(s):
Ran Tryggvadottir
Series:
KU Leuven Centre for IT & IP Law Series
Volume:
2
book | forthcoming | 1st edition
September 2018 | 450 pp.

Hardback
€105.-


ISBN 9781780686745


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Publication date: September 1, 2018

Details

Few would dispute the importance of preserving and providing access to cultural heritage and the key role of libraries in this endeavour. In an increasingly digital world, initiatives such as Google’s Book Search Project have digitised broad swathes of the world’s literary heritage and have enabled search engines to take on functions once exclusive to libraries.

Before the advent of digital technology, libraries acquired copyrighted works in tangible hard copies. Those copies were then preserved in their original form and access was granted either on the premises or through lending schemes. Today, libraries often handle works that are born digital and, in many cases, have never existed in tangible form. In addition, there is a demand to digitize analogue works, inter alia to make them available on-line. These developments and the high volume of in-copyright works in library collections create tensions with copyright law and constitute a major challenge for libraries and other cultural heritage institutions wishing to operate in the digital world. The problem is compounded by the territorial nature of copyright, which generally means that the exercise of the exclusive rights afforded by copyright in one country is geographically restricted to that country, unless the rights are specifically recognised in another country. For digital libraries who want to put in-copyright works online, the principle of territoriality usually requires them to obtain licences from rightholders for each country where a work is to be made available online. This is a major obstacle in making Europe’s cultural heritage easily accessible in the digital world.

The implications of these developments for libraries are stark; if libraries are to prevent themselves from becoming obsolete, they must provide the same services in the digital environment as they currently do in the analogue world, whilst ensuring they operate within the legal framework.

European Libraries and the Internet: Copyright and Extended Collective Licences examines libraries’ online use of in-copyright works from their collections and how such use is affected by copyright. In particular, the book examines whether the system of extended collective licences could facilitate online access without territorial limitations to in-copyright works in libraries, within Europe or more specifically within the European Economic Area (EEA). The book explores options for a legal framework, in particular the system of extended collective licences, which allow libraries to operate in the digital world while maintaining the necessary balance of rights and obligations between rightholders and users.

Chapters

There are no separate chapters available for this publication.

About the series:

KU Leuven Centre for IT & IP Law Series

The KU Leuven Centre for IT & IP Law Series brings together the results of research activities of the Centre for IT & IP Law.

The central research themes of the series concern the legal and ethical aspects of information technology, innovation and intellectual property.

Each book in the series focuses on the essential developments in the current legal framework, necessitated by the rapid evolution of technology in various fields, such as government, media, health care, informatics, digital economy, banking, transport and culture. The research is characterised by an interdisciplinary approach, constantly cross-fertilising legal, technical, economic, ethical and socio-cultural perspectives.

Books are published in English, Dutch and/or French.
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De KU Leuven Center for IT & IP Law Series verzamelt de resultaten van de onderzoeksactiviteiten van het Centrum voor IT & IP-recht.

In de reeks komen de juridische en ethische aspecten van informatietechnologie, innovatie en intellectuele eigendom aan bod.

Elk boek in de reeks belicht de belangrijke ontwikkelingen in het bestaande juridische kader die noodzakelijk zijn omwille van de snelle technologische evolutie in verschillende sectoren zoals de overheid, de media, de gezondheidszorg, informatica, de digitale economie, banken, transport en cultuur.

Elk onderwerp wordt interdisciplinair benaderd met een voortdurende kruisbestuiving tussen de juridische, technische, economische, ethische en sociaal-culturele domeinen.

De volumes in de reeks verschijnen in het Engels, Nederlands en / of Frans.
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