Whose Responsibility?

The growing attention being paid to transnational criminality and the emergence of new models of state cooperation make it necessary to reconsider the traditional features of human rights enforcement. This book provides a comprehensive analysis of how criminal procedural rights are (if at all) protected within the framework of mutual recognition within the EU. The study concentrates on the Framework Decision on the European Arrest Warrant.

Author(s):
Malin Thunberg Schunke
Series:
Supranational Criminal Law: Capita Selecta
Volume:
16
book | published | 1st edition
July 2013 | xvi + 160 pp.

Paperback
€55.-


ISBN 9781780681757


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Details

The growing attention being paid to transnational criminality and the emergence of new models of state cooperation make it necessary to reconsider the traditional features of human rights enforcement. This book provides a comprehensive analysis of how criminal procedural rights are (if at all) protected within the framework of mutual recognition within the EU. The study concentrates on the Framework Decision on the European Arrest Warrant.

The central issue of analysis is the national and extraterritorial responsibility for violations of fundamental rights which occur in the framework of such transnational procedures. Are there any provisions in international or national instruments, which aim at effectively preventing or remedying violations? Is there any functioning judicial control? The effect of national legislation and human rights bars to cooperation is discussed on the basis of a comparative study of the legislation and case-law in Sweden and the UK. Further, the roles of the European Courts for the protection of due process rights are analysed.

The book focuses on the special features of mutual recognition in relation to state responsibility for an executing and issuing State. Especially the concept of mutual trust and the justifications for a system of division of labour between the States are critically discussed. Whose responsibility? provides the reader with new and interesting perspectives regarding the specific problems of being a defendant within the EU, and gives some new answers to the question of responsibility for transnational defence rights.

About the book
‘This is no dry academic text but rather a valuable contribution to a current debate in an essential area of practice in the ever increasing field of cross-border criminal law.’
David Dickson on www.journalonline.co.uk (May 2014)

Chapters

Table of Contents (p. 0)

1. Introduction (p. 1)

2. Human rights protection at the legislative level within the EU (p. 13)

3. Human rights protection at the national level (p. 21)

4. Human rights protection and the ECtHR (p. 41)

5. The Charter of Fundamental Rights and the CJEU (p. 55)

6. Is there a sufficient system of human rights protection within cooperation based on mutual recognition? (p. 69)

7. Whose responsibility? (p. 131)

Bibliography (p. 135)

Index (p. 157)

About the series:

Supranational Criminal Law: Capita Selecta

The time that criminal law was pre-eminently a national matter is gone. Criminal law and criminal procedure is no longer solely a product of decisions made by national legislative bodies, applied by national police, prosecutors and judges. A new criminal law is developing which goes beyond separate nations: supranational criminal law.

One example of this development is the relatively young body of law concerning war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide. Particularly essential to this development has been the establishment of the ICTY, the ICTR and the ICC, and of many internationalised tribunals all over the world. A second example of the development towards the supranationalisation of criminal law can be seen on a more regional level. In Europe for instance, the area of criminal law has become a prioritised field of co-operation in the third pillar of the European Union. These supranational criminal systems are criminal systems sui generis.

That at least is the presupposition of this series on supranational criminal law. The Supranational Criminal Law: Capita Selecta series contributes to this discussion from a theoretical, dogmatic point of view, working towards new, consistent and fair penal systems, crossing the borders of the old law families and traditions.

The series is edited by Dr. Roelof H. Haveman (editor-in-chief - Rule of Law Advisor, embassy of the Netherlands in Mali), Dr. Paul J.A. De Hert (Free University of Brussels, Belgium and University of Tilburg, the Netherlands) and Dr. Alette Smeulers (University of Tilburg, the Netherlands).

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