Does Law Matter for Economic Growth?

This book addresses the role of legal institutions in economic growth. The massive differences in country incomes are largely the product of economic growth, which is in turn shaped, influenced, and determined by the legal infrastructure of a country. There has been a growing interest in exploring the connection between legal rules and economic growth since the 1990s.
Author(s):
Guangdong Xu
Series:
European Studies in Law and Economics (EDLE)
Volume:
14
book | published | 1st edition
August 2014 | xiv + 216 pp.

Paperback
€67.-


ISBN 9781780682464


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Details

This book addresses the role of legal institutions in economic growth. The massive differences in country incomes are largely the product of economic growth, which is in turn shaped, influenced, and determined by the legal infrastructure of a country. There has been a growing interest in exploring the connection between legal rules and economic growth since the 1990s, which can be attributed to the influence of Harvard economist Andrei Shleifer and his colleagues (the so-called LLSV).

LLSV substantially contribute to our understanding of the economic consequences of legal rules. However, their studies face serious challenges, and leave a number of questions unresolved. This book is part of the academic efforts to fill gaps in LLSV’s studies. The contribution of and controversy over LLSV’s studies are systematically reviewed. In addition, the book scrutinises the relationship between law (both corporate and securities law) and stock market development, analyses the role of property law in economic development, and examines the growth experience of China.

Does Law Matter for Economic Growth? will help readers to reach a deeper understanding of the relationship between law and economic growth by revealing the weaknesses in and problems with LLSV’s studies, by offering new evidence (historical, comparative, and empirical) that cast serious doubts over LLSV’s conclusions, and by analysing certain apparent anomalies that can hardly be explained by LLSV’s theory. A more cautious stance regarding the law and growth nexus is ultimately reached. Law matters for economic performance, but the extent to which it matters is defined by a broader context within which political, legal, economic, and social variables influence one another and evolve together over time. It is therefore imprudent to embrace legal reform as a panacea for economic backwardness.

The analysis offered by this book makes it an important resource for academics and policy makers alike.

Chapters

Table of Contents (p. 0)

Chapter 1. Introduction (p. 1)

Chapter 2. The Determinants of Economic Growth: From Harrod–Domar to LLSV (p. 15)

Chapter 3. Law, Stock Markets, and Economic Growth (p. 53)

Chapter 4. The Role of Property Law in Economic Growth (p. 109)

Chapter 5. Does Law Matter for China’s Economic Growth? (p. 141)

Chapter 6. Conclusion (p. 169)

References (p. 177)

About the series:

European Studies in Law and Economics (EDLE)

The series European Studies in Law and Economics is devoted to further the understanding of Law and Economics in Europe. The volumes published in this series present an interdisciplinary perspective on the effects of laws on people’s behaviour and on the economic system. The ample topics address a wide audience, including policy makers, legislators, economists, lawyers and judges. The series is peer-reviewed.

The series is an initiative of the PhD programme ‘European Doctorate in Law and Economics’ (EDLE). The EDLE is the academic response to the increasing importance of the economic analysis of law in Europe. The programme is offered by the Universities of Bologna, Hamburg and Rotterdam in association with the Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai (India). PhD students receive the unique opportunity to study law and economics in three different countries. The programme prepares economists and lawyers of high promise for an academic career in a research field of growing importance or for responsible positions in government, research organisations and international consulting firms.

The European Commission sponsors the EDLE as an excellence programme under the prestigious Erasmus Mundus scheme. For further information please visit: www.edle-phd.eu.

The editorial board of the series consists of Prof. Dr. Michael G. Faure (Erasmus University Rotterdam), Prof. Dr. Luigi A. Franzoni (University of Bologna) and Prof. Dr. Stefan Voigt (University of Hamburg).

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