About the series

European Integration and Democracy Series

European Integration and Democracy is a double peer-reviewed book series dedicated to the analysis of the challenges to democracy posed by the process of European integration, using interdisciplinary (law, history, political science, etc.) and comparative perspectives. Each volume in the series is usually devoted to a single aspect of these challenges. The intended readership includes policy makers, legal practitioners, academics and advanced students interested in a critical analysis of the interaction between the European integration and the concept of democracy.

The series was launched in 2012 and is managed by the Centre for Direct Democracy Studies (CDDS) at the Faculty of Law, University of Białystok, Poland. The Centre is devoted to analytical, theoretical, prospective and comparative research on direct democracy, democratic deficit and the role of direct democracy in regional integration. Intersentia became the series’ publisher in 2014.


Editor-in-Chief: Elżbieta Kużelewska (University of Białystok, Poland)

Editorial board: Daniel Barnhizer (Michigan State University, United States of America), Tomas Berkmanas (Vytautas Magnus University, Kaunas, Lithuania), Filip Křepelka (Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic), Erich Schweighofer (University of Vienna, Austria), Ryszard Skarzyński (University of Białystok, Poland) and Konstanty A. Wojtaszczyk (University of Warsaw, Poland).

Available volumes

  1. Trans-Atlantic Data Privacy Relations as a Challenge for Democracy
    560 pp. | paperback

    'I think you are misunderstanding the perceived problem here, Mr President. No one is saying that you broke any laws. We are just saying it is a little bit weird that you did not have to.’ - John Oliver
    €120.-
  2. European Judicial Systems as a Challenge for Democracy
    244 pp. | paperback

    The role of the European judiciary in the process of European integration cannot be overestimated. European integration after the second world war is usually analyzed from the perspective of political decisions. However, in the public debate we very often forget how much we owe to the Court of Justice of the European Union and the European Court of Human Rights.
    €60.-