Irregular Migration as a Challenge for Democracy

“Immigration has emerged as the defining issue of our times. […] The challenge that the immigration issue poses to the future of European democracy is real. Immigration itself is a genuine challenge, but the fundamental challenge that immigration brings to the fore is a domestic one, it is about fundamentally different political visions that cut through the citizenry of Europe’s nation states. With that, it becomes critically important how these nation-states, through their democratic institutions, tackle immigration.
[…] we need both the scholarly analysis and reflection presented in this volume, and we need informed political innovation within and between Europe’s nation-states.”
Editor(s):
Elzbieta Kuzelewska, Amy Weatherburn, Dariusz Kloza
Series:
European Integration and Democracy Series
Volume:
5
book | forthcoming | 1st edition
May 2018 | lviii + 276 pp.

Paperback
€89.-


ISBN 9781780686226


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Publication date: May 31, 2018

Details

“Immigration has emerged as the defining issue of our times. […] The challenge that the immigration issue poses to the future of European democracy is real. Immigration itself is a genuine challenge, but the fundamental challenge that immigration brings to the fore is a domestic one, it is about fundamentally different political visions that cut through the citizenry of Europe’s nation states. With that, it becomes critically important how these nation-states, through their democratic institutions, tackle immigration.
[…] we need both the scholarly analysis and reflection presented in this volume, and we need informed political innovation within and between Europe’s nation-states.”

– from the Foreword by Prof. Dr. Kristian Berg Harpviken,
Peace Research Institute Oslo

“[…] In result, Europe, to its series of recent big questions […] had to add another one: migrants stand ante portas and what to do with them?
[…] We have chosen to look at the extent to which the past, the present and the future of irregular migration to Europe relates to the foundational values and principles on which Europe has been built, namely democracy, the rule of law (Rechtsstaat) and the respect for fundamental rights. We focus on those people who seek in Europe various forms of help, motivated by war or other injustices in the places where they come from.
[…] the main aim of our book was to join the voluminous professional and academic literature on migration and to offer a few modest suggestion in which direction Europe should go whenever irregular migrants stand ante portas.”
– from the Preface by the Editors

“This is a timely and elaborate volume interested in the question to what extent the challenge of irregular migration poses a challenge to democracy. The authors approach this issue from different ethical, legal and political angles. They do not shy away from developing concrete recommendations as to what the European Union could do when faced with migratory pressures. Overall, therefore, a highly recommendable contribution.”

– Prof. Dr. Florian Trauner, Vrije Universiteit Brussel

Chapters

Table of contents (p. 0)

Part I. The European Integration Project and Irregular Migration: Upholding Fundamental Values and Principles

1. The 'Migrant Crisis': Member States' or EU's Responsibility? (p. 1)

2. Solidarity in EU Asylum and Migration Law: A Crisis Management Tool or a Structural Principle? (p. 23)

3. EU Foreign Policy and Other EU External Relations in Times of Crisis: Forcing the Law to Overlap? (p. 51)

4. The Migration Crisis in Europe: The Implications for Trade and Labour in a Globalised Context (p. 83)

5. Has the Migration Crisis Challenged the Concept of the Protection of the Human Rights of Migrants? The Case of Ilias and Ahmed v. Hungary (p. 97)

6. European Responses to the Mediterranean 'Refugee Crisis' and the Fear of Saving Lives (p. 113)

Part II. Migrants, Their Rights and the Limits Thereof

7. Economic Refugees: An Analysis of the Phenomenon in the Context of the EU Migration Crisis (p. 123)

8. Defining the Offence of Migrant Smuggling: When the Migration Crisis Revives Old Debates (p. 139)

9. The Collapse of the Political Offence Exemption in EU Extradition Law: The End of Political Asylum? (p. 165)

Part III. The Status Quo of Migration in Europe: Selected National Perspectives

10. The Governance of the Migrant Crisis in Italy (p. 179)

11. The Impact of the Migration Crisis on Polish Immigration and Criminal Law (p. 191)

12. The Role of NGOs as Partners in Migration Management in Estonia: A Case Study (p. 227)

13. Linguistic Integration of Adult Migrants in the Era of the Migration Crisis (p. 257)

About the series:

European Integration and Democracy Series

European Integration and Democracy is a double peer-reviewed book series dedicated to the analysis of the challenges to democracy posed by the process of European integration, using interdisciplinary (law, history, political science, etc.) and comparative perspectives. Each volume in the series is usually devoted to a single aspect of these challenges. The intended readership includes policy makers, legal practitioners, academics and advanced students interested in a critical analysis of the interaction between the European integration and the concept of democracy.

The series was launched in 2012 and is managed by the Centre for Direct Democracy Studies (CDDS) at the Faculty of Law, University of Białystok, Poland. The Centre is devoted to analytical, theoretical, prospective and comparative research on direct democracy, democratic deficit and the role of direct democracy in regional integration. Intersentia became the series’ publisher in 2014.


Editor-in-Chief: Elżbieta Kużelewska (University of Białystok, Poland)

Editorial board: Daniel Barnhizer (Michigan State University, United States of America), Tomas Berkmanas (Vytautas Magnus University, Kaunas, Lithuania), Filip Křepelka (Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic), Erich Schweighofer (University of Vienna, Austria), Ryszard Skarzyński (University of Białystok, Poland) and Konstanty A. Wojtaszczyk (University of Warsaw, Poland).

More about this series