EU Regulation of Cross-Border Carbon Capture and Storage

In 2009, the EU adopted one of the first dedicated regulatory frameworks for the deployment of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology worldwide. This book analyses the EU regulatory framework for CCS and examines its suitability for facilitating the deployment of CCS in the longer term.
Author(s):
Marijn Holwerda
Series:
Energy & Law
Volume:
14
book | published | 1st edition
December 2013 | xii + 392 pp.

Hardback
€195.-


ISBN 9781780681900


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Details

In 2009, the EU adopted one of the first dedicated regulatory frameworks for the deployment of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology worldwide. This book analyses the EU regulatory framework for CCS and examines its suitability for facilitating the deployment of CCS in the longer term.

Departing from the growing necessity for CCS projects to go beyond EU Member States’ borders, the book identifies a number of potential legal hindrances to the cross-border deployment of CCS in the EU. It examines the interaction of these legal hindrances with EU environmental, competition and free movement rules and answers the question to what extent they could indeed hamper the cross-border deployment of CCS. In doing so, the book addresses a wide variety of topics, ranging from third-party access to CCS infrastructure to the required composition of the CO2 stream for storage.

This book is one of the first contributions to examine the EU regulatory framework for CCS in the light of the growing importance of cross-border CCS deployment in the EU. It sketches the legal framework within which market players, EU Member States and the European Commission will have to operate and provides concrete lessons and recommendations for all three parties.










Chapters

Table of Contents (p. 0)

Introduction (p. 1)

Chapter I. Carbon Capture and Storage: Concept and Technology (p. 17)

Chapter II. The CCS Directive: a Brief Overview (p. 33)

Chapter III. Co2 Stream Purity and Member States’ Scope to Impose Stricter Norms (p. 49)

Chapter IV. Storage Site Stewardship Financing and the Cross-Border Storage of CO2 (p. 83)

Chapter V. Refusing Access to CCS Infrastructure and the General EU Law Principle of Loyalty (p. 129)

Chapter VI. Refusing Access to CCS Infrastructure and Article 102 TFEU (p. 169)

Chapter VII. The Development and Management of CO2 Transport Infrastructure and EU Antitrust Law (p. 235)

Chapter VIII. Centralising CO2 Storage Site Selection under EU Law (p. 271)

Chapter IX. Public Funding of CCS Infrastructure and EU State Aid Law (p. 311)

Conclusions (p. 355)

Bibliography (p. 369)

About the series:

Energy & Law

Energy & Law is a series which closely monitors the developments in energy law. Since the liberalisation of the gas and electricity markets and the development of sustainable energy sources, the European energy markets have been in constant development.

Market players have adapted themselves to these new market circumstances and the market structure of the energy sector has change thoroughly under the influence of free competition. The implementation of the EU liberalisation directives will change the organisation and working methods of the energy markets.

Energy & Law is published in parallel with the Dutch series Energie & Recht.
Editorial Committee:
- Prof. Martha M. Roggenkamp (University of Groningen, the Netherlands) - editor in chief
- Prof K. Deketelaere (University of Leuven, Belgium and University of Dundee, Scotland)

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