A Commitment to Private International Law

Since joining the Hague Conference on Private International Law in 1978, Hans van Loon has been at the forefront of private international law for well over a quarter of a century. This Liber Amicorum is a collection of contributions from friends and colleagues.

Author(s):
Permanent Bureau of the HccH
book | published | 1st edition
April 2013 | xxx + 672 pp.

Hardback
€150.-


ISBN 9781780681504

Details

Hans van Loon has been at the forefront of private international law for well over a quarter of a century. Since joining the Hague Conference on Private International Law in 1978, he has presided over remarkable growth of the Organisation and significant changes to how it operates. He has been involved in the development of nine Hague Conventions, two of which are fast approaching 100 Contracting States, as well as the revision of the Statute of the Hague Conference. In his time as Secretary General, he has seen the Organisation’s membership grow from 44 to 72 Members (with more than 60 non-Member States now party to at least one Hague Convention), which has turned the Hague Conference into a veritable world organisation. The continued relevance of the Hague Conference in the 21st century owes much to the commitment of Hans van Loon to private international law and his awareness of its role in a broader social context.

This Liber Amicorum is a collection of contributions from friends and colleagues who have shared the negotiating table with Hans van Loon at various diplomatic sessions, collaborated with him on seminars and academic pursuits around the globe, and worked alongside him at the Permanent Bureau. Its pages are testament to a long and respected career, as well as to the meaningful relationships that Hans van Loon has developed along the way with academics, judges, practitioners and government officials from various legal backgrounds.

Chapters

Table of Contents (p. 0)

Towards Global Harmonization of Conflict-of-Laws Rules in the Area of Secured Financing: The Conflict-of-Laws Recommendations of the UNCITRAL Legislative Guide on Secured Transactions (p. 1)

Post Neulinger Case Law of the European Court of Human Rights on the Hague Child Abduction Convention (p. 17)

Of Luddites and Luminaries: The Use of Modern Technologies under the Hague Legal Co-operation Conventions (p. 31)

(Cross-Border) Surrogate Motherhood: We Need to Take Action Now! (p. 47)

Some Reflections on Multiculturalism, Application of Islamic Law, Legal Pluralism and the New EU Succession Regulation (p. 59)

Conférence de La Haye et Union européenne – Synergies dans le domaine du droit des successions (p. 69)

The Protection of the Rights of Children and the Recognition of Kafala (p. 77)

Jurisdictional Developments and the New Hague Judgments Project (p. 89)

La migration de l’état civil (p. 101)

La Convention sur les aspects civils de l’enlèvement international d’enfants et les droits de l’enfant (p. 113)

Divorce – A Fundamental Right? (p. 123)

Reflections on the Malta Process (p. 135)

Le droit international privé de la famille et les droits fondamentaux de l’enfant : le choc qui fait chic ? (p. 143)

Strategic Vision and Common Sense in the Hague Conventions since 1950 (Mid-Twentieth Century) (p. 157)

Hermeneutic Dialogue between Rome I and Rome II: General Principles and Argumentative Rules (p. 169)

Individualisme et mondialisation : aspects de droit international privé de la famille (p. 181)

The Fruits of the Judgments Project (p. 195)

Building an International Cooperation System for the Civil Protection of Children (p. 207)

The Cape Town Convention and Protocols and the Conflict of Laws (p. 221)

The Use of Private International Law Escape Devices to Manage the Mediate Application of (Foreign) Human Rights in Civil and Commercial Disputes in Australia (p. 235)

Le dialogue des juges dans le contentieux privé international (p. 253)

La proposition de la Commission européenne pour un « droit commun européen de la vente » vue sous l’angle des conflits de lois (p. 259)

Innovative Features of the Hague Securities Convention (p. 271)

Instrument optionnel international et droit international privé – Subordination ou indépendance ? (p. 287)

The Draft Hague Principles on the Choice of Law in International Contracts and Rome I (p. 299)

The Need for a Global Cooperation Network to Protect Foreign Tourists/ Consumers and the Comeback of Private International Law (p. 311)

The Missing Link between Determining the Law Applicable and the Application of Foreign Law. Building on the Results of the Joint Conference on Access to Foreign Law in Civil and Commercial Matters (Brussels, 15–17 February 2012) (p. 325)

The 1993 Hague Intercountry Adoption Convention and Subsidiarity: Is the Subsidiarity Principle Still “Fit for Purpose”? (p. 343)

The Right to a Fair Trial, Forum Non Conveniens and the Limits of the Possible (p. 357)

The 1996 Hague Convention and the European Union: Connection and Disconnection (p. 371)

The Lugano Convention and the International Court of Justice (p. 381)

Substance and Procedure: Aspects of Damages in Tort in the Conflict of Laws (p. 389)

L’arbitrage étranger et la reconnaissance des sentences arbitrales étrangères dans le nouveau droit portugais de l’arbitrage (p. 397)

Exclusive Choice of Court Agreements and Parallel Proceedings (p. 409)

The Relationships between Latin America and the Hague Conference Regarding the Recent Developments of Private International Law (p. 421)

Application of the 1961 Apostille Convention in Venezuelan Exequatur Proceedings (p. 433)

La Conférence de La Haye de droit international privé : vers une coopération judiciaire dans les matières civiles et commerciales à l’échelle universelle (p. 443)

The Revolution of Private International Law in the World at Present, Regarding the Mexican Case (p. 453)

Prospects for the Convention of 30 June 2005 on Choice of Court Prospects for the Convention of 30 June 2005 on Choice of Court Agreements (p. 465)

Federalism and U.S. Implementation of PIL Conventions – Implementing the Hague Convention on Choice of Court Agreements (p. 477)

L’autonomie de la volonté dans les relations de famille internationales : regards sur les récents instruments internationaux (p. 487)

The European Private International Law and the Charter of Fundamental Rights (p. 503)

The Abolition of Exequatur and State Liability for Human Rights Violations through the Enforcement of Judgments in European Family Law (p. 515)

The EU Maintenance Regulation and the Hague Maintenance Protocol of 2007. Recognition of Foreign Judgments and the Public Policy Defence (p. 529)

The Many Perspectives of Private International Law (p. 541)

Because It Takes Two to Tango (p. 555)

Reconnaissance et hommage (p. 561)

The Relativity of Legal Positions in Cross-Border Situations. The foundations of private interregional law, private intra-community law and private international law (p. 569)

The Evolution of Technical Assistance provided by Intergovernmental Organisations. A Comparative Study of the Hague Conference, IMF, WTO , Unidroit and UNCITRAL (p. 583)

A Word of Gratitude (p. 595)

Beginning to Rethink Personal Jurisdiction (p. 597)

Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Civil Protection Orders – A Topic for the Hague Conference? (p. 609)

Public Policy in Private International Law and Its Continuing Importance (p. 621)

The World War II Distomo Massacre of Greek Civilians by German Armed Forces and the Right to Effective Judicial Protection (p. 631)

Principle of Consensus and European Union Legislative Competence in Relation to Judicial Cooperation in Civil Matters. Challenges Facing the Hague Conference on Private International Law (p. 643)

A Japanese Implementation Bill for the 1980 Child Abduction Convention (p. 661)